Bee flying near dog’s face

Key takeaway

It’s not uncommon for dogs to get stung by bees, and they’re usually fine if it’s a single bee sting. However, it’s important to watch for an allergic reaction after your dog has been stung. If your dog is having an allergic reaction, call a vet or visit an animal hospital right away.

A dog stung by a bee may have redness and swelling in the area and you may hear them whining while licking, chewing, or pawing at the site of the sting. While bee stings and insect bites aren’t typically a big deal for dogs, it’s important to treat bee stings as soon as possible to remove the venom sack.

The first thing you should do is call your vet if your dog got stung by a bee. This is especially important with multiple bee stings because the venom that bees inject can be harmful to dogs in large amounts. You can also use an ice pack to help relieve swelling and pain in the meantime. Here’s what you need to know about dogs stung by bees and what to do if your dog gets stung.

Step 1: Watch For An Allergic Reaction

Step 1: Watch For An Allergic Reaction

If your dog gets stung by a bee, the most important thing you can do is keep an eye out for an allergic reaction. These allergic reactions usually occur within 30 minutes of the bee sting, but that timeline can vary a bit.

A dog stung by a bee previously or stung by multiple bees is more likely to experience an allergic reaction. If your dog has been stung before or was stung by multiple bees, monitor them closely and call your vet if you have any questions. Keep an eye out for swelling, difficulty breathing, and signs of anaphylactic shock.

Step 2: Carefully Remove The Stinger With Tweezers

Step 2: Carefully Remove The Stinger With Tweezers

If your dog doesn’t have an allergic reaction to the sting, use tweezers or the back of a credit card to carefully remove the stinger. Getting the stinger out is important because that’s where the venom comes from. Make sure to be gentle when you’re removing the stinger, that way you don’t rupture the venom sack and cause the venom to spread.

Step 3: Apply A Paste Of Baking Soda & Water To The Wound

Step 3: Apply A Paste Of Baking Soda & Water To The Wound

Once you’ve carefully removed the stinger, a dog stung by a bee will still be in pain. You can help soothe some of the pain by mixing a little bit of water with baking soda to create a paste. Simply rub this paste on your dog’s bee sting to provide a bit of soothing relief. You can also try an oatmeal bath to soothe the pain of bee stings.

Step 4: Apply An Ice Pack For Swelling

Step 4: Apply An Ice Pack For Swelling

Bee stings generally cause swelling, and reducing that swelling is an important part of relieving the symptoms your dog is experiencing. You can use an ice pack to relieve swelling, but that may be difficult depending on the area where the bee sting is located. You may need to let your dog lie in your lap while you hold the ice pack on their bee sting. Reducing swelling in the area of a bee sting helps relieve pain, which is especially important for bee stings that your dog won’t stop chewing or licking at.

Step 5: Consult Your Vet About Antihistamines

Step 5: Consult Your Vet About Antihistamines

Antihistamines can be an effective way to reduce irritation caused by a bee sting, but you need to talk to your vet before giving your dog antihistamines. These medications work by stopping the histamine response that causes inflammation and other symptoms that come with a bee sting. However, it’s crucial that you give your dog the right dose of antihistamines, and your vet might recommend against it depending on their medical history.

When your dog gets stung by a bee, call your vet right away and ask them what to do. You can ask if antihistamines are appropriate for your dog and how to administer them. Make sure you follow any instructions your vet gives you.

Step 6: Keep Your Dog Hydrated

Step 6: Keep Your Dog Hydrated

Hydration is always important for your dog’s health, so make sure they have plenty of fresh water to drink. If your dog isn’t drinking water or is drinking an abnormal amount, let your vet know about these symptoms.

Step 7: Prevent Scratching & Irritation

Step 7: Prevent Scratching & Irritation

It’s not uncommon for dogs to scratch, bite, lick, and paw at the area where they’ve been stung by a bee. If your dog is stung by a bee, you need to make sure they’re not scratching the affected area because it can lead to skin irritation and other issues. If you have one, put an Elizabethan collar on your dog to make sure they’re not scratching or chewing on their bee sting.

Dog Stung By Bee: FAQs

What do I do when my dog gets stung by a bee?

When your dog gets stung by a bee, you should watch for an allergic reaction and call your vet. If your dog doesn’t have an allergic reaction after being stung, you can use tweezers or the back of a credit card to remove the stinger, taking care not to remove the venom sack. A baking soda and water paste along with ice packs can help reduce swelling and pain, and an Elizabethan collar can keep your dog from chewing on the sting.

Will my dog be OK after a bee sting?

So, should I be worried if my dog got stung by a bee? In many cases, dogs are just fine after being stung by a bee. While some dogs have an allergic reaction to bee stings, that’s more common in dogs who are stung by several bees or have been stung before. If your dog is stung, you should monitor their condition closely to watch for an allergic reaction.

In most cases, a dog will have an allergic reaction within the first 30 minutes of being stung by a bee.

How long after a bee sting will my dog have a reaction?

In most cases, a dog will have an allergic reaction within the first 30 minutes of being stung by a bee. If your dog doesn’t have a reaction in 30 minutes or so, you probably have nothing to worry about. You should still watch for symptoms of an allergic reaction and anaphylactic shock and call your vet if you notice any changes in your dog’s symptoms. Allergic reactions to bee stings can cause serious medical problems for dogs, so getting your dog to the vet early is important if they’re experiencing an allergic reaction.

Should I give my dog a Benadryl for a bee sting?

Sometimes, your vet may recommend giving your dog a Benadryl to help relieve irritation and other symptoms that come with a bee sting. If your dog is stung by a bee, make sure you talk to your vet before giving them a Benadryl. Antihistamines can be toxic to dogs if you give them too much, and your vet may recommend against antihistamines depending on your dog’s medical history.

Even if you don’t give your dog a Benadryl, you can reduce swelling with ice packs and provide soothing relief with a baking soda and water paste. As long as your dog isn’t showing signs of an allergic reaction, they’ll probably be fine.

How do you know if a dog is allergic to bees?

As a pet parent, it’s your job to monitor your dog after they’re stung by a bee to make sure they aren’t allergic. Signs of an allergic reaction to a bee sting include difficulty breathing, loss of consciousness, dizziness or disorientation, diarrhea, vomiting, and pale gums. If you notice these symptoms after your dog has been stung by a bee, you should take them to the vet immediately.

Keep in mind that most dogs will have an allergic reaction within 30 minutes of a bee sting if they’re going to have a reaction at all. If your dog seems fine well after being stung by a bee, you shouldn’t have anything to worry about.

Dog owner comforting dog with a bee sting

Final Notes

While bee stings are unpleasant for dogs, they’re not dangerous in many cases. As long as your dog doesn’t have an allergic reaction, you don’t have too much to worry about if your dog is stung by a bee. During the first 30 minutes after the sting, you should monitor your dog for signs of an allergic reaction, remove the stinger, and apply an ice pack to reduce swelling.

If you need a vet to help you take care of your dog’s bee sting, Dutch can help. With Dutch, you can connect with a vet online to get help from the comfort of your home.